Chair of Philosophical Anthropology and Philosophy of Mind

Painting by Ahlborn, View of the New Palace in Potsdam
Image: August Wilhelm Julius Ahlborn - Blick auf das Neue Palais in Potsdam, 1826.

This chair is dedicated to philosophical anthropology and the philosophy of mind. These are not understood as two separate, parallel disciplines, but rather as internally connected (systematically interconnected): philosophy of mind is examined from an anthropological perspective, while philosophical anthropology is reinterpreted as a theory of mind. Treating the philosophy of mind from an anthropological perspective requires examining cognition as part of the human life-form. In turn, interpreting philosophical anthropology as a theory of mind involves understanding its insights as challenging and enriching the contemporary philosophy of mind. 

In investigating the unity of philosophical anthropology and the philosophy of mind, this chair is thus devoted to philosophical issues of a fundamental nature and broad scope. Our inquiries address the nature of both subjective and objective spirit and include the investigation of both theoretical and practical reason. We thus do not confine ourselves to the investigation of cognitive operations of individual minds, but include the analysis of the social, institutional, and objective nature of cognition. And we examine not only the character of theoretical knowledge, but also the forms of practical reason. In the latter regard, we pay particular attention to phenomena and problems that demonstrate the interconnection of theoretical and practical reason, cognition and action.

Methodologically speaking, we combine systematic and historical approaches, and draw upon a variety of philosophical traditions, some of which stand in tension with one another.

Information on Prof. Dr. Thomas Khurana and the academic as well as the administrative team of the chair (Alexey Weißmüller, Isabel Sickenberger, Roman Yos, Cornelia Buschmann; Alexandra Stellmacher) can be found here.