Participants of the DH Jewish Hackathon working.
Photo: Nina Zellerhoff

DH Jewish Hackathon, 15-18 September 2022

What?  A collaborative event on challenges and research perspectives in Digital Jewish Heritage

Where? Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung, Am Neuen Markt 9d, 14467 Potsdam

When? Start: 5 p.m. of September 15, 2022 | End: 12.30 p.m. of September 18, 2022

Who? Potsdam Network for Digital Humanities, in cooperation with Moses Mendelssohn Center for European-Jewish Studies and the Fellows Yael Netzer, Itay Marienberg-Milikowsky, Gerben Zaagsma

Funded by the Henriette Herz Prize by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Organizers

Potsdam Network for Digital Humanities
Anna Busch, Daniil Skorinkin, Peer Trilcke
 

Moses Mendelssohn Center for European-Jewish Studies
Daniel Burckhardt, Miriam Rürup, Nina Zellerhoff
 

Mail: digital-humanitiesuni-potsdamde

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/DH_Potsdam #DHJewish2022

The digitization of Jewish Cultural Heritage poses new challenges yet creates new opportunities for both institutions and scholars concerned with cultural memory. In this dynamic phase of digital transformation, it is all the more essential to foster open exchange between projects and scholars from the (digital) humanities as well as from computer science. The present “DH Jewish” event is thus conceived as an opportunity that combine this open exchange with collaborative experimentation and prototyping. In pre-established or spontaneously formed teams, participants will – depending on their own interests and expertise – explore little-known datasets, venture on new research questions, experiment with ways of modeling or with novel analytical methods.

The primary aim of this Hackathon, as we understand it, is to create a shared open space in which the participants take time to discuss and experimentally explore topics at the intersection of Digital Humanities and Jewish Studies. Therefore, it is not a question of producing finished results or presenting final products, but of jointly exploring possible paths, developing prototypes, discovering spaces of practice.

Accordingly, our Hackathon involves two formats: Challenges and Sessions.

Organizers

Potsdam Network for Digital Humanities
Anna Busch, Daniil Skorinkin, Peer Trilcke
 

Moses Mendelssohn Center for European-Jewish Studies
Daniel Burckhardt, Miriam Rürup, Nina Zellerhoff
 

Mail: digital-humanitiesuni-potsdamde

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/DH_Potsdam #DHJewish2022

Participants of the DH Jewish Hackathon working.
Photo: Anna Busch

A Challenge is a task to be approached in teams (but in particular cases also individually) during the entire Hackathon. Challenges can be the development of software prototypes, the execution of digital analyses, the processing (cleaning, enrichment, etc.) of a data set, the design of a data model, the discussion of standards or ontologies, the testing of new workflows and much more. Participants faced with a challenge are usually asked to produce a specific outcome by the end of the Hackathon (a poster, a website, a piece of software, a dataset, a concept paper, etc.). Challenges can be submitted to the organizers before the Hackathon and will then be presented on this website. Together with spontaneous ideas, these challenges will be pitched at the beginning of the Hackathon, after which teams will be formed to work on selected challenges during the Hackathon. Everyone is welcome to propose Challenges (see below for information on the procedure).

Participants of the DH Jewish Hackathon working.
Photo: Anna Busch
Gerben Zaagsma holds a session at the DH Jewish Hackathon
Photo: Peer Trilcke

A Session is an input-and-discussion panel of about 20 to 30 minutes in length. Sessions are spread over the course of the Hackathon and intended to open up spaces of thought and practice, to provide intellectual inspiration and to encourage exchange. A session can be, for example, a short presentation of a data set, a platform, a software, a method, a hypothesis, a research question, or even the (preliminary) results of a research project in progress. It is important that a session offers an impulse that stimulates discussion. Usually, the presentation should not last longer than 10 minutes. Sessions can also be submitted to the organizers before the Hackathon (and will then be presented here on the website). At the beginning of the Hackathon, all participants will collaborate on a schedule based on these pre-submitted session ideas and spontaneous proposals. On each day of the Hackathon day, there will be a slot of 60 to 90 minutes for sessions. Everyone is welcome to propose sessions (see below for information on the procedure).

Gerben Zaagsma holds a session at the DH Jewish Hackathon
Photo: Peer Trilcke

Fellows

The Potsdam DH Jewish Hackathon 2022 is organized together with these three international fellows:

Portraitfoto von Yeal Netzer

Yael Netzer

Researcher and Teaching fellow at Hebrew University, Haifa University, Dicta, Ben Gurion University, Tel Aviv University

Portaitfoto von Itay Marienberg-Milikowsky

Itay Marienberg-Milikowsky

Head of the Literary Lab, Department of Hebrew Literature, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Gerben Zaagsma

Assistant Professor in Contemporary and Digital History at the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH), University of Luxemburg

Schedule

Thu, Sept. 15th Fri, Sept. 16th Sat, Sept. 17th Sun, Sept. 18th
9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.   Hackathon Hackathon Presentations, Discussions & Closing.
12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.   Lunch (at the venue) Lunch (at the venue) Get Together (Restaurant in the city centre)
1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.   Sessions Sessions  
Afternoon 5 p.m. Opening & Pitches Hackathon Hackathon  
Evening 7. p.m. Get Together (Restaurant in the city centre) Open end Open end  

Challenges

Sessions

Intersecting Networks: The Community of Enslaved People in Sephardic Households in 18th-century Barbados Amalia Levi
Diachronic Mapping in the Posen Digital Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization Alison Joseph
Overview on how current OCR/HTR software functions Benjamin Kiessling
Mapping Wartime Jewish Diaries Gerben Zaagsma
Atlas of Holocaust Literature - Warsaw Ghetto Konrad Niciński
DraCor. Drama Corpora Plattform Ingo Börner, Peer Trilcke, Daniil Skorinkin

Impressions

Day 1

DH Jewish Hackathon Collage of day 1
Picture: Jonathan Kaplan

Day 2

DH Jewish Hackathon Collage of day 2
Picture: Jonathan Kaplan

Day 3

Dh Jewish Hackathon Collage of day 3
Picture: Anna Busch

Participants

  Name Institution
1 Ingo Börner Universität Potsdam
2 Daniel Burckhardt Moses Mendelssohn Zentrum für europäisch-jüdische Studien Potsdam
3 Anna Busch Theodor-Fontane-Archiv, Universität Potsdam
4 Aaron Christianson Goethe Universität / UB Frankfurt
5 Yael Dekel Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Literary Lab
6 Avigail Friedland University of Amsterdam
7 Sebastian Göttel Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften
8 Dror Guldin  
9 Elena Hamidy University of Giessen
10 Gilad A Jacobson Shalem College of Liberal Arts, Jerusalem
11 Alison Joseph Posen Digital Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization
12 Jonathan Kaplan Goethe Universität / UB Frankfurt
13 Thekla Keuck Universität Bremen
14 Benjamin Kiessling École Pratique des Hautes Études (EPHE) part of PSL-University, Paris
15 Imme Klages Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
16 Aenne Knierim Universität Regensburg
17 Thomas Kollatz Digitale Akademie der Akademie der Wissenschaften und Literatur, Mainz
18 Juliane Kraske Deutsches Zentrum Kulturgutverluste
19 Amalia S. Levi University of Bonn
20 Felix Lohmann FH Potsdam
21 Harald Lordick Salomon Ludwig Steinheim-Institut für deutsch-jüdische Geschichte an der Universität Duisburg-Essen
22 Itay Marienberg-Milikowsky Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
23 Carsten Milling Universität Potsdam
24 Yael Netzer Hebrew University, Haifa University, Dicta, Ben Gurion University, Tel Aviv University
25 Konrad Niciński Polish Academy of Sciences
26 Lisa Pribik Leibniz-Institut für jüdische Geschichte und Kultur Simon Dubnow
27 Miriam Ruerup Moses Mendelssohn Zentrum für europäisch-jüdische Studien Potsdam
28 Sinai Rusinek University of Haifa
29 Benjamin Schnabel Hochschule der Medien, Stuttgart
30 Gil Shalit  
31 Daniil Skorinkin Universität Potsdam
32 Henny Sluyter-Gäthje Universität Potsdam
33 Jan-Erik Stange Freie Universität Berlin
34 Peer Trilcke Theodor-Fontane-Archiv, Universität Potsdam
35 Ursula Wallmeier Theodor-Fontane-Archiv, Universität Potsdam / Moses Mendelssohn Zentrum für europäisch-jüdische Studien Potsdam
36 Sabrina Werner Deutsches Zentrum Kulturgutverluste
37 Gerben Zaagsma University of Luxemburg
38 Nina Zellerhoff Moses Mendelssohn Zentrum für europäisch-jüdische Studien Potsdam