schematic representation of the absorbing effect of the substance used and the effect on contaminated water
Image: Prof. Dr. Andreas Taubert

Sustainable and low cost water treatment materials

Adsorbents based on renewable raw and waste materials, e.g. from the food industry and agroindustry, are produced via a variety of chemical modifications, thermal treatment, and addition of further functional components, such as abundant minerals like clay. The resulting materials act as adsorbents that can be used for the removal of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, herbicides, and biological contamination.

Download Tansfer Offer 21-08

schematic representation of the absorbing effect of the substance used and the effect on contaminated water
Image: Prof. Dr. Andreas Taubert

Gold-Nano star
Image: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Superstructures with nanoparticles of defined shape and size

The research group of Prof. Joachim Koetz is dealing with the synthesis of nanoparticles of different shape and size and their application as sensor materials and for the surface- enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of molecules and reaction mechanisms. The important thing here is the separation and isolation of anisotropic nanoparticles (nanotriangles and nanostars) and their surface modification. In addition to the self- organization of gold and magnetite nanoparticles, the research is focused on the insertion of these particles into Janus emulsions. This makes it possible to adjust the droplet size of stimuli-sensitive Janus emulsions, and respectively the pore sizes of the resulting aerogels. The ultralight magnetic aerogels can be used for purifying liquids (dye and oil layer separation).

Download Transfer Offer 21-02

Gold-Nano star
Image: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Destruction of the outer membrane of a microorganism by a polymer
Image: Dr. Matthias Hartlieb

Polymeric Biomaterials

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the most serious issues of today’s public health. This is where the DFG - Emmy Noether research group Polymere Biomaterialien, led by Dr. Matthias Hartlieb, starts searching for possible solutions. The scientists aim to develop membrane active, antimicrobial polymers, which are so selective towards pathogenic bacteria that they compete with conventional antibiotics. Surface coatings (on medical devices or implants) will also be investigated in the future. The advantage of such materials: the development of resistance is almost impossible.

Download Transfer Offer 20-10

Destruction of the outer membrane of a microorganism by a polymer
Image: Dr. Matthias Hartlieb

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Image: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad

Cellulose derived novel bioplastic

This bioplastic is the first polymerization of levoglucosenyl methyl ether (LME), derived from sustainable feedstock (cellulose), and developed in the research group of Prof. Helmut Schlaad.

Download Transfer Offer 20-01

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Image: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad