Einkristalle einer Nickel-Komplex-Verbindung (die 3 dunkelblau bis lila Kristalle liegen in einer gelb bis roten Flüssigkeit)
Photo: Dr. Eric Sperlich

Crystallization & X-Ray Structure Analysis

Dr. Eric Sperlichheads the X-ray crystallography service group at the Institute of Chemistry at the University of Potsdam. Together with his team, he undertakes the crystallization of substances, the structural analysis of single crystals using X-ray crystallography and the subsequent evaluation. Together with researchers, he has already published more than 50 new crystal structures.
The support service is available to both internal and external scientists as well as business partners.

Download Transfer Offer 22-04

Einkristalle einer Nickel-Komplex-Verbindung (die 3 dunkelblau bis lila Kristalle liegen in einer gelb bis roten Flüssigkeit)
Photo: Dr. Eric Sperlich

3-dimensionales Diagramm, das die Partikelgrößenverteilung nach Durchlaufen des neuartigen Chromatographieverfahren von Dr. Marek Bekir zeigt
Picture: Dr. Marek Bekir

Surface Sensitive Filtration of Microparticles

Under the project management of Dr. Marek Bekir, a new technology for chromatography is being developed that is suitable for particles in the micrometer range. A light-responsible surfactant is used for this process. Depending on the material and surface morphology (roughness, porosity) of the particles, different amounts of surfactant are absorbed.

Download Transfer Offer 22-03

3-dimensionales Diagramm, das die Partikelgrößenverteilung nach Durchlaufen des neuartigen Chromatographieverfahren von Dr. Marek Bekir zeigt
Picture: Dr. Marek Bekir

Darstellung der Synthese der beschriebenen Ionogelen
Photo: Alyna Lange

Ionic liquids based materials as electrolytes in fuel cells

Alyna Lange’s research in the group of Prof. Andreas Taubert is mainly based on the synthesis, properties and use of ionic liquids (ILs) and their derivatives for the application as electrolytes. ILs are salts which, like our table salt, consist mostly of ions. In contrast to common salts, ILs have a melting point below 100 °C, some are even liquid at room temperature. Moreover these substances have a negligible vapor pressure, are not flammable and show high thermal and electrochemical stability as well as ionic conductivities. These properties make ILs promising candidates as alternative electrolytes for solar cells, batteries or fuel cells.

Download Transfer Offer 22-01

Darstellung der Synthese der beschriebenen Ionogelen
Photo: Alyna Lange

LAMP-based detection of viral RNA on a test stripe (scheme adapted from Milenia Biotec GmbH)
Photo: Prof. Frank Bier

Ultra sensitive and robust POCT approaches for diagnostics

Prof. Dr. Frank Bier’s research group of Molecular Bioanalytics and Bioelectronics focuses on medical diagnostics, especially the development of point-of-care testings (POCT), using different molecular biological and biochemical techniques. Currently, the work focuses on various assay developments for the detection of COVID-19. The main motivation is to design smart and innovative POCT suitable for at-home-testing. One of the research projects investigates the detection of viral RNA to enable an early and reliable diagnosis of infections with SARS-CoV-2 and other pathogens. For a simple and sensitive detection a test strip assay format is combined with the much noticed technique of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) of nucleic acids. For the application oriented research projects, the group collaborates with numerous research institutions as well as companies and industries mainly in Brandenburg-Berlin area.

Download Transfer Offer 21-09

LAMP-based detection of viral RNA on a test stripe (scheme adapted from Milenia Biotec GmbH)
Photo: Prof. Frank Bier

schematic representation of the absorbing effect of the substance used and the effect on contaminated water
Photo: Prof. Dr. Andreas Taubert

Sustainable and low cost water treatment materials

Adsorbents based on renewable raw and waste materials, e.g. from the food industry and agroindustry, are produced via a variety of chemical modifications, thermal treatment, and addition of further functional components, such as abundant minerals like clay. The resulting materials act as adsorbents that can be used for the removal of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, herbicides, and biological contamination.

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schematic representation of the absorbing effect of the substance used and the effect on contaminated water
Photo: Prof. Dr. Andreas Taubert

Gold-Nano star
Photo: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Superstructures with nanoparticles of defined shape and size

The research group of Prof. Joachim Koetz is dealing with the synthesis of nanoparticles of different shape and size and their application as sensor materials and for the surface- enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of molecules and reaction mechanisms. The important thing here is the separation and isolation of anisotropic nanoparticles (nanotriangles and nanostars) and their surface modification. In addition to the self- organization of gold and magnetite nanoparticles, the research is focused on the insertion of these particles into Janus emulsions. This makes it possible to adjust the droplet size of stimuli-sensitive Janus emulsions, and respectively the pore sizes of the resulting aerogels. The ultralight magnetic aerogels can be used for purifying liquids (dye and oil layer separation).

Download Transfer Offer 21-02

Gold-Nano star
Photo: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Destruction of the outer membrane of a microorganism by a polymer
Photo: Dr. Matthias Hartlieb

Polymeric Biomaterials

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the most serious issues of today’s public health. This is where the DFG - Emmy Noether research group Polymere Biomaterialien, led by Dr. Matthias Hartlieb, starts searching for possible solutions. The scientists aim to develop membrane active, antimicrobial polymers, which are so selective towards pathogenic bacteria that they compete with conventional antibiotics. Surface coatings (on medical devices or implants) will also be investigated in the future. The advantage of such materials: the development of resistance is almost impossible.

Download Transfer Offer 20-10

Destruction of the outer membrane of a microorganism by a polymer
Photo: Dr. Matthias Hartlieb

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Photo: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad

Cellulose derived novel bioplastic

This bioplastic is the first polymerization of levoglucosenyl methyl ether (LME), derived from sustainable feedstock (cellulose), and developed in the research group of Prof. Helmut Schlaad.

Download Transfer Offer 20-01

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Photo: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad