The Résumé

Life has ups and downs and rough edges. Your résumé therefore cannot and does not have to be a straightforward narrative. It is much more important that you consider what qualifications you have and how they fit the desired position. Because, the first glance when viewing applications often falls onto the résumé. HR managers can get an idea of ​​you as an applicant within a very short time.

 

What actually makes a successful résumé? What does it look like, what has to go in, what should go out?

A résumé clearly presents relevant information about your career. The readers should get a good impression of you as an applicant:

What did you do when and where?

Again: there is no such thing as "right" or "wrong"! A résumé is unique and should suit you and the advertised job. Therefore, it does not make sense to use a template or a standard version. Our tips are only intended as a guide.

 

Weighing up content

Think about what the requirements of the intended job are and which of your previous qualifications best match it. These relevant qualifications and skills should be apparent at first glance. In applications outside of a classic academic career, all of the content usually fits on 2 pages.

 

Synchronize content

Work with keywords. What already appears in your cover letter should also be found in your résumé in the form of key terms. The information should not just repeat itself, but complement it.

 

Organize content

The résumé is structured using headings. Common categories are, for example:

  • Personal data
  • Academic career / educational path
  • Practical experience
  • Languages
  • Digital skills

You can of course sort, combine or add to the categories differently so that it suits you better. Supplements for example could be:

  • Publications
  • Further qualifications
  • Volunteering
  • Experience abroad
  • Interests and hobbies

 

Context

Add details and brief examples of an experience or activity. You can list these details in bullet points: What are the main focuses of your studies? What was the title of your last thesis? What tasks did you undertake during your internship or in your part-time jobs? This additional information motivates you to take a look at your cover letter. You should also provide details for skills such as languages ​​or software knowledge: How well have you mastered a language or a program?

 

Presentation and chronology

Clarity, structure and design are important for a good résumé. We have therefore drawn up a checklist on this topic. So much in advance: A résumé is anti-chronological, so it starts with your most recent experiences. Therefore, your most recent experience appears right at the beginning.

 

What should definitely be included?

Name and address, email address and telephone number are personal details. Date and place of birth can almost always be found. A photo, on the other hand, is not absolutely necessary, but is welcomed in many industries. The photo should be up-to-date, friendly and high-resolution. Passport photos are not suitable.

 

What should not be included?

Information about parents and siblings, and information about elementary school or salary expectations do not belong in the curriculum vitae. Religious or political views are also superfluous - unless expressly relevant to the position. You only need to mention hobbies if they are extraordinary, particularly interesting or important for the job. Give a little more information about these hobbies than just the title!

Citizenship and marital status no longer have to be stated. Depending on your own attitude towards it, both or one of the two details can be included or omitted.

The Abitur (high-school diploma) is usually given when you are still studying. But if you already have a degree and possibly a few years of professional experience, it no longer has to appear on your résumé.

 

To conclude

Finally, the date and signature should be included at the end of your résumé.

 

Anything else?

We still have a few tips:

  • When entering the Abitur / last school leaving certificate, the end date is sufficient: month and year of graduation.
  • A résumé does not have to say "CV".
  • You should also indicate smaller, non-specialist part-time jobs or honorary positions. These are often at least interesting, but sometimes even relevant and meaningful.

 

Do you have any further questions or would you like feedback on your application documents?

We would be happy to assist you during a consultation appointment.

 

Our tips for your résumé:

Weighing up content

Synchronize content

Organize content

Context

Presentation and chronology

What should definitely be included?

What should not be included?

To conclude

Anything else?