PoM February 2021
Source: M. Schinköth

Human vs computer: What effect does the source of information have on cognitive performance and achievement goal orientation?

Autoren: Nicolas Spatola, Johann Chevalère und Rebecca Lazarides

Kommentar: This study investigated the influence of the assumed source of specific feedback information (human vs. computer) for the change of cognitive and motivational processes. In doing so, the study contributes to a better understanding of the different socio-cognitive processes that shape both human interactions and human-machine interactions.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1515/pjbr-2021-0012

PoM February 2021
Source: M. Schinköth
PoM February 2021
Source: M. Schinköth

Semantic preview benefit and cost: Evidence from parafoveal fast-priming paradigm

Autoren: Jinger Pan, Ming Yan, Jochen Laubrock

Kommentar: In language processing, priming (single word presentation) or preview benefit (natural reading) are used to study the "mental lexicon". A related prime activates the target word. However, non-matching candidates must be deactivated at some point if the prime is not identical to the target word. From corpus analyses, correlative evidence has been obtained that the time course of preview benefit effects is biphasic: first an entry is primed and later inhibited. Here we present the first experimental evidence for such a biphasic course. Therefore, the time for which a preview was visible was manipulated in a gaze-contingent manner. 

Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2020.104452

PoM February 2021
Source: M. Schinköth

RFCS Paper of the Month

Logo Paper of the Month
Source: M.Schinköth

The Paper of the Month gives a special stage to current cognitive science research from the Research Focus Cognitive Sciences. The Paper of the Month is selected by the Board of Directors on a monthly basis from all submissions.

All members of the Research Focus can propose their own papers at any time. To do so, members need to send an email to the scientific coordinator, Dr. Michaela Schinkoeth. 

Your email should include the following information:  
(1) the DOI and (2) a link to the published paper OR to the preprint of the paper (for non-open access articles) and (3) a short comment on what makes your paper special.

Submit a paper for the Paper of the Month

Logo Paper of the Month
Source: M.Schinköth

Paper of the Month, January 2021

Paper of the Month, January (I)
Source: M.Schinköth

Modeling the effects of perisaccadic attention on gaze statistics during scene viewing

Autors: Lisa Schwetlick, Lars Oliver Martin Rothkegel, Hans Arne Trukenbrod, & Ralf Engbert

Comment: The paper combines two research traditions on eye movements.On the one hand, attentional processes just before, during, and immediately after saccades have been studied for >30 years ("microscopic"); on the other hand, eye movements as a consequence of selective attention in natural scenes have been studied ("macroscopic"). In the paper, we have shown that we can integrate knowledge from both domains and even improve the predictive power of the model. The paper has been prepared in an extremely appealing way for Open Science: http://lisaschwetlick.de/SceneWalk_Model/

 

Link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-020-01429-8

Paper of the Month, January (I)
Source: M.Schinköth

Paper of the Month, January (II)
Source: M.Schinköth

Bimodal familiarization re-sensitizes 12-month-old infants to other-race faces

Autors: Anna Krasotkina, Antonia Götz, Barbara Höhle, & Gudrun Schwarzer

Comment: The paper is part of a project of the DFG research group 2253 "Crossing the Borders", and is published jointly by colleagues from Potsdam and Giessen. In this work, it is shown for the first time that a learning mechanism that uses statistical information from input to form categories is also effective in the recognition of faces. The effectiveness of this type of learning is well established by prior research in the formation of linguistic categories in infants. In this study, we found that in 12-month-old infants, this type of statistical learning also affects their ability to discriminate faces of other ethnicities. This study is one component of our project investigating parallels and connections between the development of language and face recognition in early infancy.

Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2020.101502

 

Paper of the Month, January (II)
Source: M.Schinköth