Vorlesungs- und Lehrendenverzeichnis

SoSe 2017

Referring to Persons, Places, Objects, and Events in Everyday Talk

Uwe Küttner | Fr 10 - 12 Uhr | Raum: 1.19.1.22 | Erste Veranstaltung: 21.04.2017

PULS

In this course, we will explore how speakers of English refer to persons, places, objects, or events in ordinary conversation. More precisely, we will try to identify and describe referential practices by investigating when (and why) participants to a conversation choose to use certain reference forms (over others). Advanced students may also look at how speakers can depart from known default principles of reference form se-lection to accomplish certain pragmatic effects (e.g., to communicate additional social meaning) or they may want to study when and why speakers adjust their initial lexical choices, e.g., by expanding/specifying them or by replacing them with others.

Although the primary focus in this course will be on the linguistic resources speakers use for doing reference, we may also look at how they mobilize bodily-visual elements of conduct, like gaze or gestures, to this end.

Note: This is a research-oriented course and students will have to engage in small-scale research projects on a particular aspect relating to the course topic. The research methods used in this course come from the fields of Conversation Analysis (CA) and Interactional Linguistics (IL). Therefore, prior experience with, or knowledge of, the methods used in these fields will be extremely beneficial (see Barth-Weingarten 2008, Sidnell 2010, 2013, Deppermann 1999). It is also highly recommended that students who are unfamiliar with transcribing conversational talk attend the accompanying transcription tutorial.

Literatur

Barth-Weingarten, Dagmar (2008). Interactional linguistics. In: Antos, G. & Ventola, E. (Eds.), in cooperation with Weber, T. Handbooks of Applied Linguistics: Handbook of Interpersonal Communication (Vol. 2). Berlin, New York: de Gruyter, 77-105.

Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth & Barth-Weingarten, Dagmar (2011). A system for transcribing talk-in-interaction: GAT 2 – Translated and adapted for English. In: Gesprächsforschung – Online-Zeitschrift zur verbalen Interaktion 12, 1-51.

Couper-Kuhlen, Elizabeth & Selting, Margret (2001). Introducing Interactional Linguistics. In: Selting, M. & Couper-Kuhlen, E. (Eds.). Studies in Interactional Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1-22.

Deppermann, Arnulf (1999). Gespräche analysieren. Eine Einführung in konversationsanalytische Methoden. Opladen: Leske und Budrich.

Enfield, Nick J. & Stivers, Tanya (2007) (Eds.). Person reference in interaction: Linguistic, cultural, and social perspectives. Cambridge: CUP.

Fox, Barbara A. (1987). Discourse structure and anaphora: Written and conversational English. Cambridge: CUP.

Heritage, John (2007). Intersubjectivity and progressivity in references to persons (and places). In: Stivers, T. & Enfield, N. (Eds.). Person reference in interaction: Linguistic, cultural and social perspectives. Cambridge: CUP, 255-280.

Heritage, John (2010). Conversation Analysis: Practices and methods. In: Silverman, D. (Ed.). Qualitative Sociology (3rd ed.). London: Sage Publications, 208-230.

Kitzinger, Celia et al. (2013). Reformulating Place. In: Journal of Pragmatics 55, 43-50.

Mondada, Lorenza (2013). The conversation analytic approach to data collection. In: Sidnell, J. & Stivers, T. (Eds.). The Handbook of Conversation Analysis. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 32-56.

Psathas, George (1995). Conversation Analysis: The study of talk-in-interaction. London: Sage Publications.

Sacks, Harvey & Schegloff, Emanuel A. (1979). Two preferences in the organization of reference to persons in conversation and their interaction. In: Psathas, G. (Ed.). Everyday language: Studies in Ethnomethodology. New York: Irvington, 15-21.

Schegloff, Emanuel A. (1972). Notes on a conversational practice: Formulating place. In: Sudnow, D. (Ed.). Studies in social interaction. New York: The Free Press, 75-119.

Schegloff, Emanuel A. (1996). Some practices for referring to persons in talk-in-interaction: A partial sketch of a systematics. In: Fox, B.A. (Ed.). Studies in anaphora. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 437-486

Schegloff, Emanuel A. (2006). Interaction: The infrastructure for social institutions, the natural ecological niche for language, and the arena in which culture is enacted. In: Enfield, N.J. & Levinson, S.C. (Eds.). Roots of human sociality: Culture, cognition and interaction. Oxford: Berg Publishers (Bloomsbury), 70-96.

Sidnell, Jack (2010). Conversation Analysis: An introduction. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell.

Sidnell, Jack (2013). Basic conversation analytic methods. In: Sidnell, J. & Stivers, T. (Eds.). The Handbook of Conversation Analysis. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 77-99.

Stivers, Tanya (2007). Alternative Recognitionals in Person Reference. In: N.J. Enfield & T. Stivers (Eds.) Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural, and Social Perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 73-96.

Stukenbrock, Anja (2013). Sprachliche Interaktion. In: Auer, P. (Ed.). Sprachwissenschaft: Grammatik – Interaktion – Kognition. Stuttgart: Metzler, 217-260.

Wootton, Anthony J. (1989). Remarks on the methodology of conversation analysis. In: Roger, D. & Bull, P. (Eds.). Conversation: An interdisciplinary perspective. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, 238-258.

Leistungspunkterwerb

In order to obtain credits for this course, students will have to

a) make regular, active contributions to the course (e.g., post online, do short literature reviews, participate in class, etc.),
b) engage in a small-scale research project on a particular aspect relating to the course topic (this will probably have to happen in groups), and
c) present the results of this project, either in spoken or in written form (depending on the number of participants).

Studiengänge und Module

LPSWSbenotet
ML Englisch 2008
  3701 
Sprachwissenschaftliche Analyse, Vertiefungsmodul Sprachwissenschaftliche Analyse
3
2
ja
ML Englisch 2013
  262615 
Sprachwissenschaft (Testat), ANG_MA_010 Fachwissenschaftliches Vertiefungsmodul Englisch
3
2
nein
  262616 
Sprachwissenschaft (Modulprüfung), ANG_MA_010 Fachwissenschaftliches Vertiefungsmodul Englisch
3
2
ja
  262811 
Seminar mit Testat, ANG_MA_012 Vertiefungsmodul Linguistik Englisch
2
2
nein
  262812 
Seminar mit Modulprüfung, ANG_MA_012 Vertiefungsmodul Linguistik Englisch
4
2
ja
MT Fremdsprachenlinguistik 2011
  2124 
Semantik, Englisch: Vertiefungsmodul Systemlinguistik
3
2
ja
  2131 
Pragmatik, Englisch: Vertiefungsmodul Text- und Diskurslinguistik
3
2
ja
  2133 
Diskurslinguistik, Englisch: Vertiefungsmodul Text- und Diskurslinguistik
3
2
ja
  5131 
KOL: Theorie und Methoden der Gesprächsanalyse, Sprache in Erwerb und Kommunikation: Analyse und Beschreibung mündlicher Kommunikation
3
2
ja
  5132 
KOL: Struktur- und Funktionsanalyse gesprochener Interaktion, Sprache in Erwerb und Kommunikation: Analyse und Beschreibung mündlicher Kommunikation
3
2
ja
MT Linguistik: Kommunikation - Variation - Mehrsprachigkeit 2012
  1021 
Seminar, MSK 1, M2 Mündliche und schriftliche Kommunikation (MSK)
3
2
nein
  1022 
Seminar, MSK 2, M2 Mündliche und schriftliche Kommunikation (MSK)
3
2
nein
  1023 
Seminar (nicht mehr verwenden!), M2 Mündliche und schriftliche Kommunikation (MSK)
3
2
nein
  1051 
Vorlesung/Seminar, M5 Sprachbeschreibung und Sprachsystem
3
2
nein
  1052 
Vorlesung/Seminar, M5 Sprachbeschreibung und Sprachsystem
3
2
nein
  1053 
Vorlesung/Seminar, M5 Sprachbeschreibung und Sprachsystem
3
2
nein
  1061 
(Projekt-)Seminar, M6 Forschungs- und Projektarbeit
3
2
ja

Kontakt

Universität Potsdam
Philosophische Fakultät
Am Neuen Palais 10
14469 Potsdam

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