Dr. Jana Reifegerste

Biography

2010 - 2013: PhD in Psycholinguistics (Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen the Netherlands)
2008 - 2010: Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Linguistics, and Behavioural Science (McGill University, Montreal, Canada)
2005 - 2008: undergraduate studies in Psychology (Leipzig University)

Research Interests

My work focuses on the psychology of language and the (neuro-)cognitive correlates of first- and second-language acquisition and processing. Of particular interest to my research is the question of how, when, and why aging affects language processing, both in healthy participants as well as populations with neurodegenerative diseases.

Publications

Reifegerste, J. (2020). The effects of aging on bilingual language: What changes, what doesn’t, and why. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition. doi:10.1017/S1366728920000413

Reifegerste, J., Estabrooke, I. V., Russell, L. E., Veríssimo, J., Johari, K., Wilmarth, B., … Ullman, M. T. (2020). Can sex influence the neurocognition of language? Evidence from Parkinson’s disease. Neuropsychologia. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2020.107633

Reifegerste, J., Veríssimo, J., Rugg, M. D., Babcock, L., Pullman, M. Y., Glei, D. A., … Ullman, M. T. (2020). Education may help bolster nonverbal memory declines in old age, especially for women. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/13825585.2020.1736497

Reifegerste, J., Jarvis, R., & Felser, C. (2020). Effects of chronological age on native and nonnative sentence processing: Evidence from subject-verb agreement in German. Journal of Memory and Language, 111. doi: 10.1016/j.jml.2019.104083

Reifegerste, J., Elin, K., & Clahsen, H. (2019). Persistent differences between native speakers and late bilinguals: Evidence from inflectional and derivational processing in older speakers. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition22, 425-440. doi:10.1017/<wbr />S1366728918000615

Johari, K., Walenski, M., Reifegerste, J., Ashrafi, F., Behroozmand, R., Daemi, M., & Ullman, M. T. (2019). A dissociation between syntactic and lexical processing in Parkinson’s disease. Journal of Neurolinguistics51, 221-235. doi:10.1016/j.<wbr />jneuroling.2019.03.004

Johari, K., Walenski, M., Reifegerste, J., Ashrafi, F., & Ullman, M. T. (2019). Sex, dopamine, and language: A study of inflectional morphology in Parkinson’s disease. Neuropsychology33, 508-522. doi:10.1037/<wbr />neu0000533

Prehn, K., Taud, B., Reifegerste, J., Clahsen, H., & Flöel, A. (2018). Neural correlates of grammatical inflection in older native and second-language speakers. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition21, 1-12. doi:10.1017/<wbr />S1366728916001206

Reifegerste, J., & Clahsen, H. (2017). Accessing morphosyntactic information is preserved at old age, except for irregulars. The Mental Lexicon12, 342-372.

Reifegerste, J., & Felser, C. (2017). Effects of aging on interference during pronoun resolution. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research60, 3573-3589. doi:10.1044/2017_<wbr />JSLHR-L-17-0183

Clahsen, H., & Reifegerste, J. (2017). Morphological processing in old-age bilinguals. In M. Libben, M. Goral, & G. Libben (Eds.), Bilingualism: A Framework for Understanding the Mental Lexicon (pp. 217-248). Amsterdam: Benjamins.

Reifegerste, J., Hauer, F., & Felser, C. (2017). Agreement processing and attraction errors in aging: Evidence from subject-verb agreement in German. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition24, 672-702. doi:10.1080/13825585.<wbr />2016.1251550

Reifegerste, J., Meyer, A. S., & Zwitserlood, P. (2017). Inflectional complexity and experience affect plural processing in younger and older readers of Dutch and German. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience32, 471-487. doi:10.1080/23273798.<wbr />2016.1247213

Clahsen, H., Heyer, V., & Reifegerste, J. (2016). Linguistic perspectives on morphological processing. (Editorial). The Mental Lexicon11, 161-163.

Reifegerste, J. (2014). Morphological processing in younger and older people: Evidence for flexible dual-route access. (Doctoral dissertation).

To top