Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells
Image: Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack

Intelligent and efficient technologies for antibody generation

The eighteen person strong team of Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack, the Professor of Immunotechnology at the University of Potsdam, is developing innovative technologies in antibody generation. The research team is focused on the development of intelligent and efficient technologies for the generation of antibodies, in particular monoclonal and recombinant antibodies, with the aim of combining them into a unique, efficient and fast antibody producing platform to improve significantly on the standard hybridoma technology. To date, the Group has successfully collaborated with fifteen industrial partners and twelve academic partners throughout Germany.

Download Transfer Offer 20-04

Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells
Image: Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack

Stylised representation of a sequenced DNA structure
Image: ktsdesign – Fotolia

Optimizing industrial organisms for improved functionality and operational efficiency

Tailoring industrially relevant organisms for bulk production of functional biomolecules and enzymatic catalysts is of high economic and ecological interest. The Synthetic Biology Lab at the University of Potsdam, led by Dr. Lena Hochrein and Prof. Dr. Bernd Mueller-Roeber, develops tools for biotechnological applications in budding yeast and other microbial systems and plant cells. The group provides cutting-edge expertise in genome engineering and gene regulation for a wide range of applications in industrial settings.

Download Transfer Offer 21-04

Stylised representation of a sequenced DNA structure
Image: ktsdesign – Fotolia

Graphic showing how heart rate and biofeedback are processed together
Image: Prof. Dr. Julia Wendt

Biofeedback for treating psychological symptoms

Dr. Julia Wendt's team operates at the interface of clinical and biological psychology and investigates the utility of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback for the treatment of psychological symptoms. The interest is particularly focused on the suitability of biofeedback as a low intensity intervention, for example to bridge the waiting time for psychotherapy, or as an app-based intervention to create maximum availability and autonomy in its use. 

Download Transfer Offer 21-05

Graphic showing how heart rate and biofeedback are processed together
Image: Prof. Dr. Julia Wendt

on the left side 8 different molecules are shown as X-ray images and on the right side a diagram, which shows the size of molecules below a schematically shown molecule with size in Angstroms
Image: Prof. Dr. Petra Wendler

Elucidation of protein structure

The team led by Petra Wendler, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Potsdam, uses cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis to investigate the structure and structural changes of molecular machines with the highest possible resolution. The structural data obtained by cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography are combined with results from mutation analyzes and biophysical experiments, such as dynamic light scattering, in order to find answers to various biological questions.

At the University of Potsdam, the group uses a 200 kV Talos F200C equipped with a Falcon III detector to screen and visualize proteins and colloidal samples. The 3D structure of protein complexes from 200 kDa molecular weight can be solved with this setup with a resolution of up to 4 Å.

Download Transfer Offer 21-06

on the left side 8 different molecules are shown as X-ray images and on the right side a diagram, which shows the size of molecules below a schematically shown molecule with size in Angstroms
Image: Prof. Dr. Petra Wendler

3 different graphics showing results of fluorescence microscopy
Image: Prof. Dr. Salvo Chiantia

Quantifying protein-protein interactions in living cells

The group of Prof. Dr. Salvo Chiantia, Professor for Physical Biochemistry at the University of Potsdam, focuses on the application of quantitative fluorescence microscopy for the study of inter-molecular interactions. Such approaches (e.g., fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, FCS) belong to the family of fluorescence fluctuation techniques, i.e. minimally invasive methods that allow the characterization of fluorescently labeled biomolecules directly in living cells or in vitro. The analysis provides direct quantification of diffusion dynamics, protein multimerization and complex formation between different molecules.

Download Transfer Offer 21-07

3 different graphics showing results of fluorescence microscopy
Image: Prof. Dr. Salvo Chiantia

Gold-Nano star
Image: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Superstructures with nanoparticles of defined shape and size

The research group of Prof. Joachim Koetz is dealing with the synthesis of nanoparticles of different shape and size and their application as sensor materials and for the surface- enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of molecules and reaction mechanisms. The important thing here is the separation and isolation of anisotropic nanoparticles (nanotriangles and nanostars) and their surface modification. In addition to the self- organization of gold and magnetite nanoparticles, the research is focused on the insertion of these particles into Janus emulsions. This makes it possible to adjust the droplet size of stimuli-sensitive Janus emulsions, and respectively the pore sizes of the resulting aerogels. The ultralight magnetic aerogels can be used for purifying liquids (dye and oil layer separation).

Download Transfer Offer 21-02

Gold-Nano star
Image: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz