Transfer Offers from the University of Potsdam

At the University of Potsdam, ideas and solutions are created that offer great potential for business. It is the task of Potsdam Transfer to identify these results and to apply them economically. In our technology profiles we present application-oriented research and research results and look for partners for their use or joint further development.

Please contact us if you have any questions or ideas for an application. We will be happy to put you in contact with the scientists and support you in further steps.


Graphic showing how heart rate and biofeedback are processed together
Image: Prof. Dr. Julia Wendt

Biofeedback for treating psychological symptoms

Dr. Julia Wendt's team operates at the interface of clinical and biological psychology and investigates the utility of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback for the treatment of psychological symptoms. The interest is particularly focused on the suitability of biofeedback as a low intensity intervention, for example to bridge the waiting time for psychotherapy, or as an app-based intervention to create maximum availability and autonomy in its use. 

Download Transfer Offer 21-05

Graphic showing how heart rate and biofeedback are processed together
Image: Prof. Dr. Julia Wendt

Stylised representation of a sequenced DNA structure
Image: ktsdesign – Fotolia

Optimizing industrial organisms for improved functionality and operational efficiency

Tailoring industrially relevant organisms for bulk production of functional biomolecules and enzymatic catalysts is of high economic and ecological interest. The Synthetic Biology Lab at the University of Potsdam, led by Dr. Lena Hochrein and Prof. Dr. Bernd Mueller-Roeber, develops tools for biotechnological applications in budding yeast and other microbial systems and plant cells. The group provides cutting-edge expertise in genome engineering and gene regulation for a wide range of applications in industrial settings.

Download Transfer Offer 21-04

Stylised representation of a sequenced DNA structure
Image: ktsdesign – Fotolia

Nanostructure of silver and DNA
Image: Prof. Dr. Ilko Bald

Hybrid Nanostructures

The research of the working group Hybrid Nanostructures under the leadership of Prof. Ilko Bald combines different methods from DNA nanotechnology, optical spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy in order to study physico-chemical processes at the single-molecule level. The aim is to develop novel analysis methods for their application in different fields, such as the precise with nanomaterials. Apart from methods diagnostics using optical fibers modified development, specific questions such as nucleotide sequence dependence of DNA radiation damage and the mode of action of radionsensitizers that are applied in tumor radiation therapy are being investigated. Furthermore, chemical processes on the surface of plasmonic nanostructures that are triggered by electron transfer are analysed.

Download Transfer Offer 21-03

Nanostructure of silver and DNA
Image: Prof. Dr. Ilko Bald

Gold-Nano star
Image: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Superstructures with nanoparticles of defined shape and size

The research group of Prof. Joachim Koetz is dealing with the synthesis of nanoparticles of different shape and size and their application as sensor materials and for the surface- enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of molecules and reaction mechanisms. The important thing here is the separation and isolation of anisotropic nanoparticles (nanotriangles and nanostars) and their surface modification. In addition to the self- organization of gold and magnetite nanoparticles, the research is focused on the insertion of these particles into Janus emulsions. This makes it possible to adjust the droplet size of stimuli-sensitive Janus emulsions, and respectively the pore sizes of the resulting aerogels. The ultralight magnetic aerogels can be used for purifying liquids (dye and oil layer separation).

Download Transfer Offer 21-02

Gold-Nano star
Image: Prof. Dr. Joachim Koetz

Image of nanomaterial from Dr. Pacholski
Photo: Dr. Claudia Pacholski

Chemical Strategies for Functional Nano- Structures

The research group Functional Materials of Dr Claudia Pacholski aims to fabricate materials with new and exciting properties, that can later be used as optical sensors. The scientists of the group synthesize nanomaterials and investigate their chemistry as well as their optical properties. A special focus is on the preparation and self-assembly of inorganic nanomaterials in combination with polymers.

The team uses various methods and is interested in different areas of application. For example, through the action of energy new nanomaterials or nanostructures with unusual structural, electrical, optical or magnetic properties and functionalities can be generated. These form the basis

for the development of new materials and sensors.

Download Transfer Offer 21-01

Image of nanomaterial from Dr. Pacholski
Photo: Dr. Claudia Pacholski



Potassco's process chain compared to conventional tools
Image: Prof. Schaub
Potassco's process chain compared to conventional tools

Potassco Solutions: Problem solving with knowledge based AI

Whether you want to make optimum use of your production facilities, efficiently plan personnel shifts, or support your engineering design process with intelligent tools, the Potassco Solutions project team, led by Prof. Dr. Torsten Schaub, offers you its world-renowned Potassco AI, with which you can solve and optimise a variety of complex tasks in your company. The basis for this is your pre-existing organisational knowledge, such as your technologies, processes and structures. The information is first formally modelled and then processed by the Potassco-AI in such a way that the resulting solutions are comprehensible, practicable and - in case of changes - adaptable.

Download Transfer Offer 20-08

Potassco's process chain compared to conventional tools
Image: Prof. Schaub
Potassco's process chain compared to conventional tools

SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)

Electromigration for making small metallic contacts

The research team of Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel, Professor of Experimental Physics of Condensed Matter at the University of Potsdam, aims to understand the relationship between atomic and mesocopic structures as well as electronic transport in nanostructures. The technique of electromigration is used to create nanometer distance metallic contacts, from which the group seeks to understand these nanostructures as well as further refine the manufacturing processes. To date, the group has successfully collaborated with several academic and industrial partners throughout Europe.

Download Transfer Offer 20-06

SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)
Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture

Nanometer-scale imaging and measurements: Atomic Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

The research team of Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel, the Professor of Experimental physics of condensed matter at the University of Potsdam, aims to understand the relationship between atomic and mesocopic structures as well as electronic transport in nanostructures. To investigate these nanostructures, the research team uses atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy to conduct nanometer-scale imaging and measurements. To date, the group has successfully collaborated with several academic and industrial partners throughout Europe.

Download Transfer Offer 20-05

Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture
Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells
Image: Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack
Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells

Intelligent and efficient technologies for antibody generation

The eighteen person strong team of Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack, the Professor of Immunotechnology at the University of Potsdam, is developing innovative technologies in antibody generation. The research team is focused on the development of intelligent and efficient technologies for the generation of antibodies, in particular monoclonal and recombinant antibodies, with the aim of combining them into a unique, efficient and fast antibody producing platform to improve significantly on the standard hybridoma technology. To date, the Group has successfully collaborated with fifteen industrial partners and twelve academic partners throughout Germany.

Download Transfer Offer 20-04

Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells
Image: Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack
Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells

Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants
Image: Prof. Dr. Jörg Fettke
Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants

Biopolymer Analytics for crop improvement

The 13 person strong team of the Biopolymer Analytics group led by Prof apl. Dr. habil Joerg Fettke, is interested in primary metabolism of plants,  specially starch metabolism. Starch synthesis and degradation includes several enzymes (>40) and different glycans, sugars, and sugar derivatives.  The interplay between all these components as well as the fluxes through the various pathways are of special interest to the group.

Download Transfer Offer 20-03

Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants
Image: Prof. Dr. Jörg Fettke
Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Image: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad
Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas

Cellulose derived novel bioplastic

This bioplastic is the first polymerization of levoglucosenyl methyl ether (LME), derived from sustainable feedstock (cellulose), and developed in the research group of Prof. Helmut Schlaad.

Download Transfer Offer 20-01

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Image: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad
Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas