Transfer Offers from the University of Potsdam

At the University of Potsdam, ideas and solutions are created that offer great potential for business. It is the task of Potsdam Transfer to identify these results and to apply them economically. In our technology profiles we present application-oriented research and research results and look for partners for their use or joint further development.

Please contact us if you have any questions or ideas for an application. We will be happy to put you in contact with the scientists and support you in further steps.


Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Image: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad
Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas

Cellulose derived novel bioplastic

This bioplastic is the first polymerization of levoglucosenyl methyl ether (LME), derived from sustainable feedstock (cellulose), and developed in the research group of Prof. Helmut Schlaad.

Download Transfer Offer 20-01

Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas
Image: Prof. Dr. Helmut Schlaad
Schematic representation of the polymerization and material conversion including structural formulas

Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants
Image: Prof. Dr. Jörg Fettke
Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants

Biopolymer Analytics for crop improvement

The 13 person strong team of the Biopolymer Analytics group led by Prof apl. Dr. habil Joerg Fettke, is interested in primary metabolism of plants,  specially starch metabolism. Starch synthesis and degradation includes several enzymes (>40) and different glycans, sugars, and sugar derivatives.  The interplay between all these components as well as the fluxes through the various pathways are of special interest to the group.

Download Transfer Offer 20-03

Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants
Image: Prof. Dr. Jörg Fettke
Collage of several images: electron microscope images of parts of plants and images of plants

Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells
Image: Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack
Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells

Intelligent and efficient technologies for antibody generation

The eighteen person strong team of Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack, the Professor of Immunotechnology at the University of Potsdam, is developing innovative technologies in antibody generation. The research team is focused on the development of intelligent and efficient technologies for the generation of antibodies, in particular monoclonal and recombinant antibodies, with the aim of combining them into a unique, efficient and fast antibody producing platform to improve significantly on the standard hybridoma technology. To date, the Group has successfully collaborated with fifteen industrial partners and twelve academic partners throughout Germany.

Download Transfer Offer 20-04

Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells
Image: Prof. Dr. Katja Hanack
Collage of several images: protein structures and microscopic images of cells

Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture

Nanometer-scale imaging and measurements: Atomic Force Microscopy and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

The research team of Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel, the Professor of Experimental physics of condensed matter at the University of Potsdam, aims to understand the relationship between atomic and mesocopic structures as well as electronic transport in nanostructures. To investigate these nanostructures, the research team uses atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy to conduct nanometer-scale imaging and measurements. To date, the group has successfully collaborated with several academic and industrial partners throughout Europe.

Download Transfer Offer 20-05

Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
Growth of Pb islands in Si-rich areas within the wetting layer. Right: SFM topographic image. Left: corresponding KPFM picture

SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)

Electromigration for making small metallic contacts

The research team of Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel, Professor of Experimental Physics of Condensed Matter at the University of Potsdam, aims to understand the relationship between atomic and mesocopic structures as well as electronic transport in nanostructures. The technique of electromigration is used to create nanometer distance metallic contacts, from which the group seeks to understand these nanostructures as well as further refine the manufacturing processes. To date, the group has successfully collaborated with several academic and industrial partners throughout Europe.

Download Transfer Offer 20-06

SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)
Image: Prof. Dr. Regina Hoffmann-Vogel
SFM image of the area affected by electromigration (a) Overview of the anode side (b) Area, represented by a black square in (a)