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    Listen.UP-The new podcast on knowledge and technology transfer at the University of Potsdam

    Grafik Listen.UP
    Picture: Julia Depis

    Listen.UP

    The transfer of knowledge and technologies from the university into practice is gaining social and economic importance. Even now, none of the pressing questions of the future can be answered without innovations from science. As the third mission of modern universities, transfer takes on many new forms, which we want to make visible in our podcast Listen.UP. We are not only interested in the latest research and study results, but also in their social relevance.

    Listen.UP, the new podcast on knowledge and technology transfer, will initially appear monthly with at least 3 episodes and can also be heard on the following platforms:

    Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Deezer, Amazon Music

     


    #27 - Jan Bernoth: Digital science communication

    Computer scientist Jan Bernoth works and is doing his doctorate at the University of Potsdam in the Innovative University. As part of his doctorate, he has developed a dashboard that enables scientists to better communicate their research to society. A tool for digital science communication, but also for acquiring and expanding knowledge and keeping up to date in one's own or other people's research areas. The dashboard can be used by scientists and students. A variety of filter options allow for demand-oriented use.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #26 - Prof. Dr. Tim Dietrich: Of neutron stars and gravitational waves

    Prof. Dr Tim Dietrich works in the field of gravitational waves and has been Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics at the University of Potsdam since 2020.

    In episode 26, he tells us what happens when neutron stars collide and why the measurement of gravitational waves was such a big breakthrough a few years ago, because they were already predicted by Albert Einstein. He explains how they are created and how they can be measured.

    He also talks about how he got into astrophysics and what interesting projects he has planned for the future.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #25 - Anja Tschiersch: Augmented Reality in Chemistry classes

    At the Institute of Chemistry at the University of Potsdam, research assistant Anja Tschiersch is developing and testing didactic concepts for chemistry lessons as part of her doctorate.
    She is working on using augmented reality to present classical spatial representations of chemical formulae to pupils in a clear and comprehensible way in 3D models. This involves integrating a digital element within a real representation of the environment in an app. The digital elements can be edited interactively within the app. Together with interested teachers, she tests and optimises these applications in order to implement the transfer from research to school in the best possible way.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #24 - Klara Seitz: Writing a digital crochet tutorial

    Crochet as a graph structure, what that means, how you can create digital crochet instructions nowadays and why you have to teach the computer to crochet first is what software developer Klara Seitz tells us in the 24th podcast episode of Listen.UP.
    Together with game designer Lydia Herrmann, Klara Seitz founded the start-up ChartCrafter to provide crochet designers with a tool to automatically transform their digital crochet designs into texts in different languages or to develop various output formats such as tutorials for users.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #23 - Nicole Behrend: The positive body image

    In the context of her doctoral thesis, the psychologist Nicole Behrend deals with the question of under which circumstances people develop an appreciative attitude towards their body and what effect a positive body image has on other areas of psychological well-being.
    She is looking at the appreciation of one's own body in different groups of people and which factors can have an influence on body image.
    Through her research results, she hopes to improve preventive and curative interventions for eating disorders.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #22 - Dr. Bettina Neumann: The development of a sensitive COVID-19 rapid test

    In episode 22, Dr Bettina Neumann reports on her research into new COVID-19 test methods.
    The working group she is part of wants to develop tests that deliver comparable results to the PCR test and yet are much faster and can even be carried out in the doctor's office or at home.
    This will be a universal method that can then be adapted to other viral diseases in a modified form.
    In our 22nd episode of the Listen.UP podcast, she tells us what challenges she and her colleagues have to overcome and what motivates them.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #21 - Stephanie Schlappa: Research close to practice

    Chemist Stephanie Schlappa explains in the podcast episode "Research close to practice" how turbid or milky liquids can be analysed with photon density wave spectroscopy, why this is so innovative and how it can help to optimise manufacturing processes in industry and make them more sustainable.
    Stephanie Schlappa is working on her dissertation and is the scientific coordinator of the Joint Lab OPAT on the technology campus of the "Innovative University of Applied Sciences Potsdam" project. The joint labs are new forms of cooperation that promote transfer and create cross-organisational, jointly usable spaces for experimentation and thinking. These help to find innovative solutions to scientific and technological problems more quickly.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #20 - Dr. Jennifer Schulz: Urban Forest Gardens

    To make their urban environment more liveable, more and more urban gardeners want to grow crops themselves and implement new more sustainable concepts. The project "Urban Forest Gardens" is a joint project of the University of Potsdam together with the Bezirksverband Berlin-Süden der Kleingärtner e.V., Freilandlabor Britz e.V. and the Environmental and Garden Office of the City of Kassel and has been led by Dr Jennifer Schulz and her colleague Dr Torsten Lipp since 2018. They have set themselves the goal of promoting environmental education, social interaction and a near-natural and long-term form of "urban gardening" and have been testing this in three forest gardens in Berlin and Kassel since April 2021. Forest gardens are long-term projects, as the growth of perennial plants and trees has to be planned for, but the plantings have a positive effect on the overheated urban climate, soil protection and provide habitats for various animal species.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #19 - Dr. Aljoscha Rheinwalt: Point clouds and virtual realities

    In episode 19, physicist Dr Aljoscha Rheinwalt deals with old and new techniques from geo-remote sensing. At the Institute of Geosciences, he is working on further developing methods for virtually measuring complex surfaces from point cloud data. Together with his colleagues from the Geological Remote Sensing working group, he is researching the various approaches to measuring reality via virtual reality, which have not been very reliable so far, and optimising them. These methods could then possibly also be used for autonomous driving; integrating them more strongly is a near goal of Dr. Rheinwalt.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #18 - Dr. Ina Henkel: Dog food made from insects

    With insect-based dog food, the start-up EntoNative GmbH wants to break new, unusual ground.
    Co-founder of EntoNative GmbH, nutritionist Dr Ina Henkel from the University of Potsdam, has realised her desire for more sustainability for humans and animals and a healthier life for dogs under the brand TENETRIO and produces dog food and healthy dog snacks from mealworms.
    Mealworms have a high nutritional content and are also very sustainable. Raising insects conserves resources because they require only a fraction of the water, food and space needed by conventional livestock, such as cattle. Mealworms also emit hardly any greenhouse gases and their utilisation is also much more efficient, as they are 100 % edible.
    These and many other reasons led Ina Henkel and her co-founders to found the start-up EntoNative GmbH in 2017 with the support of the start-up service of the University of Potsdam.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #17 - Ulrike Böttcher & Nina Kahmke: Fasteners from Biopolymers and Food Scraps

    Textile and surface designer Ulrike Böttcher and product designer Nina Kahmke present their company valupa in episode 17. The young startup was funded by the EXIST startup grant and is made up of the English words for "value" and "parts". The name stands for the appreciation of even the smallest components of textile products, because valupa produces fasteners from biodegradable plastics and residual materials from the food industry. In this way, the founders want to help make clothing more recyclable and counteract the waste of raw materials.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #16 - Annika Koch: Diversity and religious festivities in the German educational system

    Episode 16 of Listen.UP deals with the topic of diversity and religious festivities in the German educational system.

    Annika Koch, a research associate in organizational and behavioral sociology, wants to raise awareness of this issue among teachers, decision-makers, and the broader public. She specializes in questions concerning the functioning of our society and its institutions and, in doing so, aims to shed light on social injustices. In doing so, Annika Koch examines how the German educational system responds to and deals with diversity and religious holidays. In particular, she looks at how they deal with Christmas, the largest Christian holiday in context with Ramadan, the largest Muslim festivity.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #15 - Dr. Anna Busch & Prof. Dr. Peer Trilcke: Digital Strategies for the Literary Archive of the Future

    As director and deputy director of the Theodor-Fontane-Archive, Germanist Prof. Dr. Peer Trilcke and literary scholar Dr. Anna Busch have been thinking for some time about how to improve the transfer of literature and cultural-historical knowledge using the tools of digitization. In the 15th episode of the Listen.UP podcast, they talk about the idea of openness, the great treasure trove of data that the Theodor Fontane Archive makes freely available, and research on Theodor Fontane, whom Peer Trilcke describes as a figure who still looks at us very modernly today.

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    #14 - Dr. Matthias Hartlieb: With carrot and microbiological bottle brush against resistant bacterial strains

    Together with his DFG-funded Emmy Noether junior research group, chemist Dr. Matthias Hartlieb is looking for an answer to the problem of antimicrobial resistance. The last 70 to 80 years of medical development were only possible, Dr. Hartlieb explains, because there were functioning antibiotics that could be administered routinely and also preventively. It is precisely this protection against bacterial infections that is increasingly coming under threat from resistance. Since his postdoctoral position at the University of Warwick (UK), he has been working with so-called antimicrobial polymers. His research aims to make these polymers so efficient and tolerable that they can one day be used as an alternative to conventional antibiotics. A major advantage is that antimicrobial polymers are relatively insensitive to resistance. The road to developing polymers for clinical control of harmful bacteria is still long, but it would be an answer to one of our greatest medical challenges.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #13 - Dr. Christoph Schmitz: In the field

    In episode 13, Listen.UP presents a start-up project that was already supported by the University of Potsdam in 2014. Dr. Christoph Schmitz of Acker e. V. is working to increase appreciation for nature and food. Acker e. V. is a social enterprise that operates at the interface of education, agriculture, environment and nutrition. Acker is convinced that only a society that values nature and food is fit for the future. With its practice-oriented educational programs, the social enterprise therefore creates formative nature experiences for children and adults throughout Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Its offerings include the award-winning GemüseAckerdemie and AckerRacker educational programs for daycare centers and schools. With offerings for adults, Acker also carries its mission into businesses, tenancies and private homes. In the Listen.UP podcast from the University of Potsdam, Christoph Schmitz talks about the history and mission of Acker, focusing on the topic of knowledge transfer: how can acker impart knowledge and why he believes that appreciation for nature and food can best be achieved through dirty hands.

     

     

     

     

     

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    #12 - Katrin Völkner & Florian Sievert: Transfer of innovations in the educational sector

    School reimagined: in the 12th episode of the Listen.UP podcast, a sub-project of the Innovative University, the Bildungscampus, has its say. Katrin Völkner and Florian Sievert, both project managers at the Bildungscampus, present their concept for a university school at the University of Potsdam. For the past 2 years, the Education Campus has been working in a cooperative process with a mixed team of teachers, students, academics, and other education experts to further develop the university school framework. They are working on supporting schools in dealing with highly topical issues such as digitalization, inclusion and climate change with supplementary or rethought structures, measures and methods.

     

     

     

     

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    #11 - Ariane Müting: Changes of the terrestrial surface

    How do humans affect the Earth system? This was one of the questions that led Ms. Ariane Müting to study earth and environmental sciences. During their studies, geology students still explore the terrain through numerous excursions in order to apply their acquired knowledge and to recognize the structures they know from theory in nature. But how the earth's surface changes can also be observed well by means of remote sensing, so one can get every corner of the earth at the workplace. The data on the earth's surface and atmosphere required for this are collected without contact via sensors on drones, aircraft and satellites. Ms. Müting wrote her master's thesis on the creation of three-dimensional elevation models of the Earth's surface based on such satellite images, and she is also working on this as a doctoral student in the same area of investigation. In the Andes, in the northwest of Argentina. There, the University of Potsdam has had numerous collaborations with local authorities, universities and research institutions for years.

     

     

     

     

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    #10 - Dr. Laura Schaefer & Prof. Frank Bittmann: Stand firm- the adaptive force

    Adaptive force is the special muscle function that we need to adapt to external forces. In the process, we have to hold on. Since this holding and braking function of the muscles seems to play a central role in orthopedic complaints, but also in mental problems or post-infectious conditions, Prof. Frank Bittmann and Dr. Laura Schaefer have developed a device with which the adaptive force, which has so far been largely ignored, can be measured. It can be used for research and in a therapeutic context. In addition, the device can also measure oscillations, which - according to a preliminary study by Schaefer and Bittmann - could become interesting for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Prof. Bittmann is Professor of Regulatory Physiology and Prevention at the University of Potsdam and Dr. Schaefer is a research associate in the Department of Sport and Health Sciences.

     

     

     

     

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    #09 - Dr. Barbora Šedová: Practical forecasts on climate change and migration?

    Dr. Barbora Šedová is an environmental economist and FutureLab leader at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Change PIK. In her work, she analyzes mechanisms and contextual impacts of climate-related influences on human migration, inequality and conflict risks in countries of the Global South.

    In the "FutureLab - Security, Ethnic conflicts and migration" where Dr. Sedova is co-leader, policy makers are prepared through knowledge transfer for conflicts that arise when urbanization increases and cities become social hotspots. After all, whether climate-induced migration presents itself as a disaster or an opportunity is ultimately a question of political governance, Barbora Sedova says. In doing so, she hopes to generate understanding for these opportunities among decision-makers and the general public.

     

     

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    #08- Dr. Marvin Münzberg: What actually happens there?

    "What actually happens there?" asks chemist Dr. Marvin Münzberg from the University of Potsdam in the 8th episode. He works in the field of physical chemistry and has already worked on process analyses as part of his doctorate. Dr. Münzberg heads the Analytical Photonics group at InnoFSPEC Potsdam and is working on process optimization of an optical measurement technique of photon density wave spectroscopy together with cooperation partners from industry. In order to obtain as good and comprehensive an overall picture as possible, the analysis methods are adapted and further developed here as required. Therefore, Dr. Münzberg wishes for the future that this form of process analytics would be used as a matter of course in every industrial manufacturing process. And also under the aspect of the development of Industry 4.0, problems would be approached in this way and the question would be asked more frequently: What actually happens there? And where can I then intervene? Transcript

     

     

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    #07- Marie-Christine Zeisberg: Proposed solutions for the raw material paradox

    Episode 7 of our podcast series is about solutions proposed by lawyer Dr. Marie-Christine Zeisberg for fair, secure and sustainable regulations of raw materials under international law. She studied law at the Humboldt University of Berlin and received her doctorate from the University of Potsdam. Her dissertation on international commodity law was published by Nomos Verlag and nominated for the Better World Award 2021.

    For Dr. Zeisberg, a fair, secure and sustainable distribution of raw materials worldwide is one of the most important tasks facing humanity in the 21st century and, with its effects on life, the environment and technical progress, determines the fate of the continuously growing world population. Transcript

     

     

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    #06- Stefanie Kunkel: Digitalization under the banner of sustainability

    Stefanie Kunkel studied Public Economics in Berlin and is now doing research at the IASS, Institute for Transformative Sustainability Research within the research group "Digitalization and Transformation towards Sustainability". This is where she is also writing her dissertation on "Green Value Chains through Industry 4.0" for which she received a nomination for the Better World Award 2021.

    Her research focuses on sustainability in the supply chains of the globalized economy - and how digitalization can and will impact this, and that Industry 4.0 is a vision in many areas but not yet actually implemented. Transcript

     

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    #05 - Thea Fühner & Prof. Dr. Reinhold Kliegl: "Data for deeds" in matters of school sports

    In the fifth episode of "Listen.UP", sports scientist Thea Fühner and cognitive psychologist Prof. Reinhold Kliegl talk about the EMOTIKON primary school sports project. Both are conducting joint research at the Institute for Training and Movement Sciences at the University of Potsdam, which is conducting the study.
    The EMOTIKON primary school sports project has been running since 2009 and is a large-scale statistical study on the topic of school sports. It evaluates the motor skills of third graders in the state of Brandenburg. As part of the intervention programs proposed by the EMOTIKON team, there are numerous recommendations for action to promote the development of children's physical fitness. The suggestions for compensating for the negative effects of social change on physical activity behavior are appropriate for children and support the natural urge to move of 8 to 9-year-olds. Transcript

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    #04 - Prof. Dr. Hubert Wiggering: The salt in the soup of the agricultural scientist

    Prof. Dr. Hubert Wiggering is Professor of Geoecology and leads the "Land Sciences" working group at the University of Potsdam.
    In the fourth podcast episode of "Listen.UP", he talks about his ideal of knowledge transfer and his bilateral collaboration with farmers in which he involves them in the scientific knowledge process on site, increasing efficiency on both sides.

    He presents his farm of the future and explains that for him there is not only the ideal farm, but rather an ideal region where farmers cooperate, complement each other and thus adapt to the site conditions. Hubert Wiggering also gives shape to his vision of the farm of the future in his book "Cows in the washing system". Transcript

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    #03 - Bryan Nowack: Making agriculture future-proof through basic research

    The third episode of "Listen.UP" takes us into molecular biology and proves how basic research prepares the soil for later applications. In plant physiology, PhD student Bryan Nowack is researching the stress resistance of new varieties in order to adapt them to the requirements of a changing climate and thus secure the production of food in a future-oriented agriculture. Transcript

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    #02 - Luise Roither: Applied generational justice

    Luise Roither is a health economist and completed a part-time MBA at the University of Potsdam. In her master's thesis, she dealt with the long-term care provision fund against the background of a social long-term care insurance and was thus nominated for the Better World Award 2021. She is active in the "Denkschmiede Gesundheit" and argues in her podcast for more generational justice in the system. Transcript

     

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    #01 - Dr. Julian Risch: The concept behind words

    In the first episode of the Listen.UP podcast, the winner of the Better World Award 2021, Dr. Julian Risch, presents a machine learning method that automatically filters out hate comments in online discussions so that a moderation team can decide whether to remove them. The first editorial teams are already working with it. Born in Berlin in 1991, Julian Risch studied IT systems engineering at the University of Potsdam. After completing his master's degree, he began his doctoral studies in the Hasso Plattner Institute's research college on the topic of "Analysis of Reader Comments on Online News Platforms." Since successfully completing his doctorate in December 2020, Dr. Risch has been working as a machine learning engineer at a Berlin-based start-up that develops open source software for semantic search in texts. Transcript

     

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    The podcast "Listen.UP-The podcast of the University of Potsdam" was created by:

    speak low-publishing and media production: conception, interviews, production

    Tapati Nobis: coordination

    Julia Depis: illustration

    Platzhalter Kontaktbox

    Anja Turkalj

    Mitarbeiterin Marketing und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit

     

    Campus Golm
    Potsdam Transfer
    Innovative Hochschule Potsdam
    Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, Haus 10
    14476 Potsdam

    Portrait Prof. Dr. Hans-Hennig von Grünberg

    Prof. Dr. Hans-Hennig von Grünberg

    General project management

     

    Campus Golm
    Universität Potsdam
    Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
    Professur für Wissens- und Technologietransfer
    Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, Haus 29
    14476 Potsdam

    Portait Tapati Nobis

    Tapati Nobis

    Transfer advisor Faculty of Human Sciences

     

    Campus Golm
    Potsdam Transfer
    Innovative Hochschule Potsdam
    Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, Haus 10
    14476 Potsdam

    Portrait Alexander Griffiths Foto: Tapati Nobis UP

    Alexander Griffiths

    Scientific assistant

     

    Campus Golm
    Potsdam Transfer
    Innovative Hochschule Potsdam
    Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, Haus 10
    14476 Potsdam